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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 2156969, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2156969
Review Article

Self-Administered Mind-Body Practices for Reducing Health Disparities: An Interprofessional Opinion and Call to Action

1Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, VA, USA
2Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Division of Epidemiology, Virginia Commonwealth School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA

Received 23 March 2016; Accepted 22 August 2016

Academic Editor: Florian Pfab

Copyright © 2016 Patricia A. Kinser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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