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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 2986090, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2986090
Research Article

Antidepressant-Like Effect of Lipid Extract of Channa striatus in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Model of Depression in Rats

1Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 8 September 2016; Accepted 16 November 2016

Academic Editor: Gioacchino Calapai

Copyright © 2016 Mohamed Saleem Abdul Shukkoor et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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