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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3284704, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3284704
Research Article

Rhus javanica Gall Extract Inhibits the Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Osteoclasts and Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss

1Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu 41940, Republic of Korea
2Skeletal Diseases Genome Research Center, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu 41940, Republic of Korea
3Department of Oral Pathology and Regenerative Medicine, School of Dentistry, IHBR, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41940, Republic of Korea
4Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41944, Republic of Korea
5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41944, Republic of Korea
6School of Food Science & Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Republic of Korea

Received 29 February 2016; Revised 27 April 2016; Accepted 10 May 2016

Academic Editor: Yoshiki Mukudai

Copyright © 2016 Tae-Ho Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption is a therapeutic strategy for the management of postmenopausal bone loss. This study investigated the effects of Rhus javanica (R. javanica) extracts on bone marrow cultures to develop agents from natural sources that may prevent osteoclastogenesis. Extracts of R. javanica (eGr) cocoons spun by Rhus javanica (Bell.) Baker inhibited the osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. The effects of aqueous extract (aeGr) or 100% ethanolic extract (eeGr) on ovariectomy- (OVX-) induced bone loss were investigated by various biochemical assays. Furthermore, microcomputed tomography (µCT) was performed to study bone remodeling. Oral administration of eGr (30 mg or 100 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks) augmented the inhibition of femoral bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), and other factors involved in bone remodeling when compared to OVX controls. Additionally, eGr slightly decreased bone turnover markers that were increased by OVX. Therefore, it may be suggested that the protective effects of eGr could have originated from the suppression of OVX-induced increase in bone turnover. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that eGr has potential to activate bone remodeling by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and bone loss.