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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3840202, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3840202
Research Article

Analgesic Neural Circuits Are Activated by Electroacupuncture at Two Sets of Acupoints

1College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China
2College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China

Received 27 April 2016; Revised 3 June 2016; Accepted 5 June 2016

Academic Editor: Ke Ren

Copyright © 2016 Man-Li Hu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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