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References

  1. A. Rosén, M. Lekander, K. Jensen et al., “The effects of positive or neutral communication during acupuncture for relaxing effects: a sham-controlled randomized trial,” Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2016, Article ID 3925878, 11 pages, 2016.
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 3925878, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3925878
Research Article

The Effects of Positive or Neutral Communication during Acupuncture for Relaxing Effects: A Sham-Controlled Randomized Trial

1Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Osher Centre for Integrative Medicine, Karolinska Institute, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
2Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
3Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden

Received 16 December 2015; Accepted 12 January 2016

Academic Editor: Panos Barlas

Copyright © 2016 Annelie Rosén et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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