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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2016, Article ID 6108203, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6108203
Research Article

In Vivo Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Pistacia lentiscus Fruit Oil and Its Effects on Oxidative Stress

1Research Unit of Anatomy-Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Sfax, Tunisia
2Research Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Sfax, Tunisia

Received 29 August 2016; Accepted 2 November 2016

Academic Editor: Yoshiji Ohta

Copyright © 2016 Sameh Ben Khedir et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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