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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 1676808, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1676808
Research Article

Antidepressant Mechanism Research of Acupuncture: Insights from a Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Frontal Cortex in Rats with Chronic Restraint Stress

1School of Acupuncture, Moxibustion and Tuina, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, China
2School of Science, Beijing Technology and Business University, Beijing 100048, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Tuya Bao; ten.362@bayut

Received 5 May 2017; Revised 12 July 2017; Accepted 26 July 2017; Published 26 September 2017

Academic Editor: Gang Chen

Copyright © 2017 Yu Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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