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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 3014019, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3014019
Review Article

A Review of the Potential of Phytochemicals from Prunus africana (Hook f.) Kalkman Stem Bark for Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy of Prostate Cancer

1University of Science & Technology (UST), Korean Medicine Life Science, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea
2Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM), Yuseongdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34054, Republic of Korea
3Natural Chemotherapeutics Research Institute (NCRI), Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 4864, Kampala, Uganda
4Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda

Correspondence should be addressed to Youngmin Kang; rk.er.moik@gnakmy

Received 6 December 2016; Accepted 22 January 2017; Published 13 February 2017

Academic Editor: Dan Gincel

Copyright © 2017 Richard Komakech et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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