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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3043061, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3043061
Research Article

Documentation of Herbal Medicines Used for the Treatment and Management of Human Diseases by Some Communities in Southern Ghana

Department of Plant and Environmental Biology, University of Ghana, P.O. Box LG 55, Legon, Ghana

Correspondence should be addressed to Alex Asase

Received 19 January 2017; Revised 31 March 2017; Accepted 3 May 2017; Published 8 June 2017

Academic Editor: Andrea Pieroni

Copyright © 2017 Augustine A. Boadu and Alex Asase. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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