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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 4245830, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4245830
Research Article

Adverse Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extracts and the Major Components in the Stems of Impatiens balsamina L. on Caenorhabditis elegans

1College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210046, China
2Nanjing Institute for Comprehensive Utilization of Wild Plant, Nanjing 210042, China
3School of Pharmaceutical Engineering and Life Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213264, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Guo-Xin Shi; nc.ude.unjn@ihsxg and Wei-Ming Zhang; moc.361@hzynatob

Received 20 July 2016; Revised 24 October 2016; Accepted 22 December 2016; Published 23 February 2017

Academic Editor: Nunziatina De Tommasi

Copyright © 2017 Hong-Fang Jiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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