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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 4730878, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4730878
Research Article

trans-Cinnamaldehyde Inhibits Microglial Activation and Improves Neuronal Survival against Neuroinflammation in BV2 Microglial Cells with Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation

1Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203, China
2Department of Clinical and Classic Medicine, School of Basic Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203, China
3South China Research Center for Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Medical College of Acu-Moxi and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, 232 Waihuan Dong Road, Guangzhou 510006, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Ying Xu; moc.nuyila@3002216gniy and Yongjun Chen; moc.621@714jyhc

Received 8 May 2017; Revised 3 September 2017; Accepted 19 September 2017; Published 22 October 2017

Academic Editor: Eman Al-Sayed

Copyright © 2017 Yan Fu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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