Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4854720, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4854720
Research Article

QGQS Granule in SHR Serum Metabonomics Study Based on Tools of UPLC-Q-TOF and Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Form Protein Profilin-1

Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yuanhui Hu

Received 10 September 2016; Revised 15 January 2017; Accepted 24 January 2017; Published 6 March 2017

Academic Editor: Ki-Wan Oh

Copyright © 2017 Ke Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. C. M. Lawes, S. V. Hoorn, and A. Rodgers, “Global burden of blood-pressure-related disease, 2001,” The Lancet, vol. 371, no. 9623, pp. 1513–1518, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. V. Chobanian, G. L. Bakris, H. R. Black et al., “The seventh report of the joint national committee on prevention, detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure: the JNC 7 report,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 289, no. 19, pp. 2560–2572, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. T. Krause, K. Lovibond, M. Caulfield, T. McCormack, and B. Williams, “Management of hypertension: summary of NICE guidance,” BMJ (Online), vol. 343, Article ID d4891, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. P. A. James, S. Oparil, B. L. Carter et al., “Evidence-based guideline for the management of high blood pressure in adults: report from the panel members appointed to the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8),” The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 311, pp. 507–520, 2014. View at Google Scholar
  5. X.-Y. Lu and Z.-X. Shi, “Key points in treating hypertension by integrative medicine,” Chinese Journal of Integrated Traditional and Western Medicine, vol. 31, no. 11, pp. 1561–1564, 2011. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. Y. Wang, H. Tang, J. K. Nicholson, P. J. Hylands, J. Sampson, and E. Holmes, “A metabonomic strategy for the detection of the metabolic effects of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) ingestion,” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 191–196, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  7. R. Williams, H. Major, E. Lock, E. Lenz, and I. Wilson, “d-Serine-induced nephrotoxicity: a HPLC–TOF/MS-based metabonomics approach,” Toxicology, vol. 207, no. 2, pp. 179–190, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  8. Y.-Y. Zhao, X.-L. Cheng, F. Wei, X. Bai, and R.-C. Lin, “Application of faecal metabonomics on an experimental model of tubulointerstitial fibrosis by ultra performance liquid chromatography/high- sensitivity mass spectrometry with MSE data collection technique,” Biomarkers, vol. 17, no. 8, pp. 721–729, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. I. D. Wilson, R. Plumb, J. Granger, H. Major, R. Williams, and E. M. Lenz, “HPLC-MS-based methods for the study of metabonomics,” Journal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences, vol. 817, no. 1, pp. 67–76, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. J. Yang, X. Zhao, X. Liu et al., “High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for metabonomics: potential biomarkers for acute deterioration of liver function in chronic hepatitis B,” Journal of Proteome Research, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 554–561, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. S. Wagner, K. Scholz, M. Sieber, M. Kellert, and W. Voelkel, “Tools in metabonomics: an integrated validation approach for LC-MS metabolic profiling of mercapturic acids in human urine,” Analytical Chemistry, vol. 79, no. 7, pp. 2918–2926, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y. Chu, H. Jiang, J. Ju et al., “A metabolomic study using HPLC-TOF/MS coupled with ingenuity pathway analysis: intervention effects of Rhizoma Alismatis on spontaneous hypertensive rats,” Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis, vol. 117, pp. 446–452, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. H. Jiang, Z. Shen, Y. Chu et al., “Serum metabolomics research of the anti-hypertensive effects of Tengfu Jiangya tablet on spontaneously hypertensive rats,” Journal of Chromatography B: Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences, vol. 1002, pp. 210–217, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. H. Jiang, L. Nie, Y. Li, and J. Xie, “Application of ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry to metabonomic study on spontaneously hypertensive rats and intervention effects of Ping Gan prescription,” Journal of Separation Science, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 483–489, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. B. Song, H. Jin, X. Yu et al., “Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 attenuates oxidative stress and VSMC proliferation via the JAK2/STAT3/SOCS3 and profilin-1/MAPK signaling pathways,” Regulatory Peptides, vol. 185, pp. 44–51, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. H.-Y. Jin, B. Song, G. Y. Oudit et al., “ACE2 deficiency enhances angiotensin II-mediated aortic profilin-1 expression, inflammation and peroxynitrite production,” PLOS ONE, vol. 7, no. 6, Article ID e38502, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. P. Song, Z. Z. Zhang, H. Y. Jin et al., “Influence of irbesartan on vascular Profilin-1-STAT3 signaling and oxidative stress level in hypertensive mice,” Chinese Journal of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 6, no. 22, pp. 45–47, 2013. View at Google Scholar
  18. J. Aoki, A. Taira, Y. Takanezawa et al., “Serum lysophosphatidic acid is produced through diverse phospholipase pathways,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 277, no. 50, pp. 48737–48744, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. Takahashi, H. Okazaki, Y. Ogata, K. Takeuchi, U. Ikeda, and K. Shimada, “Lysophosphatidylcholine induces apoptosis in human endothelial cells through a p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism,” Atherosclerosis, vol. 161, no. 2, pp. 387–394, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. Y. Rikitake, S. Kawashima, T. Yamashita et al., “Lysophosphatidylcholine inhibits endothelial cell migration and proliferation via inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway,” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 1006–1012, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. T. Quinn, S. Parthasarathy, and D. Steinberg, “Lysophosphatidylcholine: a chemotactic factor for human monocytes and its potential role in atherogenesis,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 85, no. 8, pp. 2805–2809, 1988. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. N. Kume, M. I. Cybulsky, and M. A. Gimbrone Jr., “Lysophosphatidylcholine, a component of atherogenic lipoproteins, induces mononuclear leukocyte adhesion molecules in cultured human and rabbit arterial endothelial cells,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 90, no. 3, pp. 1138–1144, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. N. Kume and M. A. Gimbrone Jr., “Lysophosphatidylcholine transcriptionally induces growth factor gene expression in cultured human endothelial cells,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 93, no. 2, pp. 907–911, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. M. Jougasaki, K. Kugiyama, Y. Saito, K. Nakao, H. Imura, and H. Yasue, “Suppression of endothelin-1 secretion by lysophosphatidylcholine in oxidized low density lipoprotein in cultured vascular endothelial cells,” Circulation Research, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 614–619, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. H. Yang, F. Man, L. Li, and C. Lu, “Changes in erythrocyte phospholipids patients with hypertension at each stage,” Journal of Jiamusi Medical College, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 65–67, 1996 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  26. S. Borodzicz, K. Czarzasta, M. Kuch, and A. Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, “Sphingolipids in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders,” Lipids in Health and Disease, vol. 14, no. 1, article no. 55, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. C. G. Tepper, S. Jayadev, B. Liu et al., “Role for ceramide as an endogenous mediator of Fas-induced cytotoxicity,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 92, no. 18, pp. 8443–8447, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. Testi, “Sphingomyelin breakdown and cell fate,” Trends in Biochemical Sciences, vol. 21, no. 12, pp. 468–471, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. M. Knapp, M. Zendzian-Piotrowska, A. Błachnio-Zabielska, P. Zabielski, K. Kurek, and J. Górski, “Myocardial infarction differentially alters sphingolipid levels in plasma, erythrocytes and platelets of the rat,” Basic Research in Cardiology, vol. 107, no. 6, article no. 294, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. V. Parra, F. Moraga, J. Kuzmicic et al., “Calcium and mitochondrial metabolism in ceramide-induced cardiomyocyte death,” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta—Molecular Basis of Disease, vol. 1832, no. 8, pp. 1334–1344, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. G. Chen and Z. Ding, “The function of activated protein kinase under cell apoptosis induced by ceramide,” Journal of Medical Molecular Biology, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 14–17, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  32. L. Ni and D.-W. Wang, “[Association between cytochrome P450 enzymes metabolism and cardiovascular protection],” Zhonghua xin xue guan bing za zhi, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 377–379, 2010. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. L. Yuan and L. Zhou, “Effect of arachidonic acid metabolism on cardiac fibrosis associated with inflammation,” Advances in Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 62–65, 2010. View at Google Scholar
  34. H. Francois, K. Athirakul, D. Howell et al., “Prostacyclin protects against elevated blood pressure and cardiac fibrosis,” Cell Metabolism, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 201–207, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. H. Sprecher, M. VanRollins, F. Sun, A. Wyche, and P. Needleman, “Dihomo-prostaglandins and -thromboxane. A prostaglandin family from adrenic acid that may be preferentially synthesized in the kidney,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 257, no. 7, pp. 3912–3918, 1982. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C. Chen and T. L. Yang, “TXA2/PGI2 and cardiovascular disease,” Progress in Modern Biomedicine, vol. 8, no. 11, pp. 2166–2168, 2008 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  37. J. Y. He and Q. C. Lin, “Clinical study on intracellular free calcium of platelets and plasma TXA2/PGI2 balance in patients with essential hypertension,” Journal of Clinical Cardiology, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 23–24, 2007 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  38. R. Spanbroek, R. Gräbner, K. Lötzer et al., “Expanding expression of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway within the arterial wall during human atherogenesis,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 100, no. 3, pp. 1238–1243, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. L. M. Cagen and P. G. Baer, “Adrenic acid inhibits prostaglandin synthesis,” Life Sciences, vol. 26, no. 10, pp. 765–770, 1980. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. P. G. Kopf, D. X. Zhang, K. M. Gauthier et al., “Adrenic acid metabolites as endogenous endothelium-derived and zona glomerulosa-derived hyperpolarizing factors,” Hypertension, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 547–554, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. D. Garnier, “Acetylcholine and the myocardium: electrophysiological spects,” American Journal of Physiology, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 145–159, 1987. View at Google Scholar
  42. W. J. Zang, J. Lu, D. L. Li et al., “Advances in protective effects of vagal nerve and acetylcholine against ischemia injury to myocardium,” Progress in Physiological Science, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 292–296, 2006 (Chinese). View at Google Scholar
  43. L. L. Wu, Cardiovascular Pathophysiology, Beijing Medical University Press, Beijing, China, 2000.
  44. G. Chugh, M. F. Lokhandwala, and M. Asghar, “Altered functioning of both renal dopamine D1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptors causes hypertension in old rats,” Hypertension, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 1029–1036, 2012. View at Google Scholar
  45. A. C. Montezano, A. Nguyen Dinh Cat, F. J. Rios, and R. M. Touyz, “Angiotensin II and vascular injury,” Current Hypertension Reports, vol. 16, no. 6, article 431, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. T.-D. Liao, X.-P. Yang, Y.-H. Liu et al., “Role of inflammation in the development of renal damage and dysfunction in angiotensin II-induced hypertension,” Hypertension, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 256–263, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. U. Landmesser, S. Spiekermann, C. Preuss et al., “Angiotensin II induces endothelial xanthine oxidase activation: role for endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary disease,” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 943–948, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  48. M. Radenković, M. Stojanović, T. Potpara, and M. Prostran, “Therapeutic approach in the improvement of endothelial dysfunction: the current state of the art,” BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, Article ID 252158, 12 pages, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. H. Funke-Kaiser, F. S. Zollmann, J. H. Schefe, and T. Unger, “Signal transduction of the (pro)renin receptor as a novel therapeutic target for preventing end-organ damage,” Hypertension Research, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 98–104, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. P. Waghe, T. S. Sarath, P. Gupta et al., “Arsenic causes aortic dysfunction and systemic hypertension in rats: augmentation of angiotensin II signaling,” Chemico-Biological Interactions, vol. 237, pp. 104–114, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus