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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4856412, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4856412
Research Article

Could We Really Use Aloe vera Food Supplements to Treat Diabetes? Quality Control Issues

Pharmacognosy Research Laboratories & Herbal Analysis Services UK, University of Greenwich, Medway Campus, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Solomon Habtemariam; ku.oc.sisylanalabreh@mairametbah.s

Received 8 September 2017; Accepted 5 November 2017; Published 6 December 2017

Academic Editor: Gioacchino Calapai

Copyright © 2017 Solomon Habtemariam. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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