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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 5076029, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5076029
Research Article

Antiamylase, Anticholinesterases, Antiglycation, and Glycation Reversing Potential of Bark and Leaf of Ceylon Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume) In Vitro

1Herbal Technology Section (HTS), Modern Research & Development Complex (MRDC), Industrial Technology Institute (ITI), 503A Halbarawa Gardens, Malabe, Sri Lanka
2Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka
3Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, General Sir John Kotelawala Defence University, Ratmalana, Sri Lanka

Correspondence should be addressed to Sirimal Premakumara Galbada Arachchige; kl.iti@psag

Received 3 June 2017; Revised 25 July 2017; Accepted 3 August 2017; Published 30 August 2017

Academic Editor: Luigi Milella

Copyright © 2017 Sirimal Premakumara Galbada Arachchige et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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