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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 5435831, 30 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5435831
Review Article

Extraoral Taste Receptor Discovery: New Light on Ayurvedic Pharmacology

1Biochemistry Department, Faculty of General Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, B-dul “Eroilor Sanitari” No. 8, Sector 6, 76241 Bucharest, Romania
2Medical Semiology Department, Faculty of General Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, B-dul “Eroilor Sanitari” No. 8, Sector 6, 76241 Bucharest, Romania
3Nephrology Clinic, University Emergency Hospital Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania

Correspondence should be addressed to Marilena Gilca; moc.liamg@acliganeliram

Received 29 January 2017; Revised 22 March 2017; Accepted 27 April 2017; Published 31 May 2017

Academic Editor: Marco Leonti

Copyright © 2017 Marilena Gilca and Dorin Dragos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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