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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 6310967, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6310967
Research Article

The Immune Effects of an African Traditional Energy Tonic in In Vitro and In Vivo Models

1Traditional Medicine Laboratory, School of Nursing and Public Health, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
2Department of Public Management and Economics, Faculty of Management Sciences, Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa
3Biomedical Research Centre, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
4Kwazihlahla Zemithi, J2067, Umlazi, Durban 4031, South Africa

Correspondence should be addressed to Nceba Gqaleni; moc.liamg@0585abecn

Received 18 August 2016; Revised 25 October 2016; Accepted 20 February 2017; Published 20 March 2017

Academic Editor: Raffaele Capasso

Copyright © 2017 Mlungisi Ngcobo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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