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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 6421260, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6421260
Research Article

Electroacupuncture Alleviates Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Aged Rats by Inhibiting Hippocampal Neuroinflammation Activated via Microglia/TLRs Pathway

1Department of Neurobiology & Acupuncture Research, The Third Clinical College, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310053, China
2Medical Department for Senior Cadres, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310005, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Zhe Liu; moc.361@uilsrss and Gai-mei Wang; moc.361@kbgyysz

Received 3 February 2017; Revised 18 April 2017; Accepted 30 April 2017; Published 8 June 2017

Academic Editor: Elia Ranzato

Copyright © 2017 Pei-pei Feng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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