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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 8429290, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8429290
Research Article

Passiflora cincinnata Extract Delays the Development of Motor Signs and Prevents Dopaminergic Loss in a Mice Model of Parkinson’s Disease

1Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, Brazil
2Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE, Brazil
3Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil
4Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Santos, SP, Brazil

Correspondence should be addressed to Alessandra Mussi Ribeiro; moc.liamg@birmela

Received 24 March 2017; Accepted 20 June 2017; Published 1 August 2017

Academic Editor: Gunhyuk Park

Copyright © 2017 Luiz Eduardo Mateus Brandão et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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