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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 9134173, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9134173
Research Article

Effect of Tai Chi Training on Dual-Tasking Performance That Involves Stepping Down among Stroke Survivors: A Pilot Study

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Correspondence should be addressed to William Wai-Nam Tsang; kh.ude.uylop@gnast.mailliw

Received 27 June 2017; Accepted 10 October 2017; Published 15 November 2017

Academic Editor: Darren R. Williams

Copyright © 2017 Wing-Nga Chan and William Wai-Nam Tsang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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