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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2017, Article ID 9480791, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9480791
Research Article

Determination of the Wound Healing Potentials of Medicinal Plants Historically Used in Ghana

1Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
2Museum of Natural Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Anna K. Jäger; kd.uk.dnus@regaj.anna

Received 12 December 2016; Accepted 16 January 2017; Published 23 February 2017

Academic Editor: Ipek Suntar

Copyright © 2017 Sara H. Freiesleben et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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