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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 2738489, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2738489
Research Article

Seasonal Effect on the Biological Activities of Litsea glaucescens Kunth Extracts

1Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo (CIAD), 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico
2Departamento de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad de Sonora, Rosales y Luis Encinas, 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico
3Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, A.C., CONSORCIO-ADESUR, Av. Normalistas 800, Colinas de la Normal, 44270 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico
4Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco, A.C., Clúster Científico y Tecnológico Biomimic®, Carretera Antigua a Coatepec No. 351, Colonia El Haya, 91070 Xalapa, VER, Mexico
5Red de Estudios Moleculares Avanzados, Clúster Biomimic®, Instituto de Ecología, A. C., Carretera Antigua a Coatepec No. 351, Colonia El Haya, 91070 Xalapa, VER, Mexico
6Unidad de Servicios de Apoyo en Resolución Analítica, Universidad Veracruzana, 575 Xalapa, VER, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Zaira Domínguez; xm.vu@zeugnimodz and Javier Hernández; xm.vu@zenitramvaj

Received 14 October 2017; Revised 14 January 2018; Accepted 22 January 2018; Published 20 February 2018

Academic Editor: Letizia Angiolella

Copyright © 2018 Julio César López-Romero et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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