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Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 5123217, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5123217
Review Article

Mind-Body Therapies for African-American Women at Risk for Cardiometabolic Disease: A Systematic Review

1Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, 1100 E. Leigh St., P.O. Box 980567, Richmond, VA 23298, USA
2University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Nursing, 307 E. Carrington Hall, Campus Box 7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460, USA
3Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, 509 N. 12th Street, P.O. Box 980582, Richmond, VA 23298, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Candace C. Johnson; ude.ucv@7mcnosnhoj

Received 23 May 2017; Accepted 4 December 2017; Published 26 February 2018

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Caminiti

Copyright © 2018 Candace C. Johnson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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