Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Traditional Chinese Exercise for Chronic Diseases


Publishing date
01 Mar 2021
Status
Closed
Submission deadline
16 Oct 2020

Lead Editor

1Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, China

2Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, USA

3Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China

4University of Maryland, Baltimore, USA

5Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Fuzhou, China

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Traditional Chinese Exercise for Chronic Diseases

This issue is now closed for submissions.
More articles will be published in the near future.

Description

Chronic diseases (or non-communicable diseases) are generally defined as human health conditions that may not have a cure, develop slowly, and require long-term medical management. The major types of chronic diseases include cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancer, musculoskeletal disorders, degenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Of note, these chronic diseases are increasingly recognized as the leading cause of death and disability worldwide and cause a substantial economic burden on healthcare and society.

Physical inactivity is increasingly recognized as an important factor in increasing the risk of development of many chronic diseases. In addition, physical activity is widely accepted as an easily accessible solution that can provide health benefits without any side effects, including preventing the onset of chronic diseases or delaying their progression. Traditional Chinese exercises (TCE) have been utilised as part of traditional Chinese medicine for health promotion and symptomatic management of chronic diseases for thousands of years. TCEs mainly consist of Tai Chi and Qigong (Baduanjin, Liuzijue, and Wuqinxi) which possess a similar philosophy - flowing movements are performed in coordination with muscle stretching and relaxation, sleep breathing, proprioceptive awareness (mental focus), and a meditative state of mind. Such unique features have gained increasing popularity worldwide, especially for those suffering from chronic diseases with low exercise intolerance. A few key interventional studies have shown clinically meaningful improvements associated with TCEs among individuals with Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia, and heart failure, which indicates that further investigations are needed for other types of chronic diseases like lower back pain, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In particular, research into elucidating the mechanisms of the potential beneficial effects of TCE is still in its infancy.

The aim of this Special Issue is to gather original research, review articles, consensus statements, and guidelines on traditional Chinese exercise in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. We are particularly interested in manuscripts that report the physiological and psychological effects as well as the underlying mechanisms of traditional Chinese exercise for chronic diseases.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Health economics research of TCEs for chronic diseases
  • Clinical studies/trials of TCEs for chronic diseases
  • Studies investigating the mechanisms of TCEs for chronic diseases
  • Reviews and meta-analysis of TCEs for chronic diseases
  • Consensus statement and guidelines of TCEs for chronic diseases

Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 8882961
  • - Review Article

Effects of Combined Physical Activity and Cognitive Training on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Subjective Cognitive Decline: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Qianqian Sun | Shurui Xu | ... | Jiao Liu
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 6651238
  • - Review Article

Clinical Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise on Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Randomized Controlled Trials

Chi-Chun Kuo | Chiao-Chen Wang | ... | Tao-Hsin Tung
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 8833736
  • - Research Article

The Feasibility and Positive Effects of Wuqinxi Exercise on the Cognitive and Motor Functions of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study

Mengyue Shen | Yan-Ling Pi | ... | Zhen Wang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 6636847
  • - Review Article

The Influences of Tai Chi on Balance Function and Exercise Capacity among Stroke Patients: A Meta-Analysis

Xinhu Zheng | Xiaoyang Wu | ... | Xing Wang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 8883460
  • - Research Article

The Specific and Nonspecific Effects of Tai Chi and Its Possible Central Responses: A Protocol of Neuroimaging Study

Tianyu Liu | Yuke Teng | ... | Fang Zeng
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 8880716
  • - Research Article

Effects of Basketball and Baduanjin Exercise Interventions on Problematic Smartphone Use and Mental Health among College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Tao Xiao | Can Jiao | ... | Jieting Zhang
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 8867098
  • - Review Article

The Safety of Baduanjin Exercise: A Systematic Review

Jianqi Fang | Liying Zhang | ... | Xiaowen Lian
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2021
  • - Article ID 6637612
  • - Review Article

The Impact of Tai Chi on Motor Function, Balance, and Quality of Life in Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Xing Yu | Xinze Wu | ... | Qi Guo
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 6637489
  • - Review Article

Review of Clinical Trials on the Effects of Tai Chi Practice on Primary Hypertension: The Current State of Study Design and Quality Control

Yuke Teng | Sha Yang | ... | Fang Zeng
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2020
  • - Article ID 9218078
  • - Research Article

Effects of Body Weight Support-Tai Chi Footwork Training on Balance Control and Walking Function in Stroke Survivors with Hemiplegia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

Xiao-Ming Yu | Xue-Ming Jin | ... | Jun Hu
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.