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Education Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 428639, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/428639
Review Article

Assessing Self-Regulation as a Cyclical, Context-Specific Phenomenon: Overview and Analysis of SRL Microanalytic Protocols

1Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
2Department of Educational Psychology, Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA

Received 11 November 2011; Accepted 30 March 2012

Academic Editor: Mariel F. Musso

Copyright © 2012 Timothy J. Cleary et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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