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Education Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 147310, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/147310
Research Article

Management and Administration Issues in Greek Secondary Schools: Self-Evaluation of the Head Teacher Role

1General Department of Education, School of Pedagogical and Technological Education, 14121 Irakleio Attikis, Greece
2Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Pedagogy, University of Western Macedonia, 3rd km of National Road Florinas-Nikis, 53100 Florina, Greece

Received 20 May 2014; Accepted 11 December 2014; Published 31 December 2014

Academic Editor: Bernhard Schmidt-Hertha

Copyright © 2014 Argyrios Argyriou and George Iordanidis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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