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Education Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 4178471, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4178471
Research Article

Preferences of Dental Students towards Teaching Strategies in Two Major Dental Colleges in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

1Department of Prosthetic Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, P.O. Box 60169, Riyadh 11545, Saudi Arabia
2Armed Forces Hospital, King Abdulaziz Naval Base, Jubail 35512, Saudi Arabia
3Nayel Clinics, Riyadh 12473, Saudi Arabia

Received 7 May 2016; Accepted 5 July 2016

Academic Editor: Gwo-Jen Hwang

Copyright © 2016 Eman M. AlHamdan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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