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Education Research International
Volume 2016, Article ID 7097398, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7097398
Research Article

Flipping a Dental Anatomy Course: A Retrospective Study Over Four Years

1School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia
2School of Medical Science, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia

Received 25 March 2016; Accepted 30 May 2016

Academic Editor: Karl Kingsley

Copyright © 2016 Mahmoud M. Bakr et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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