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Education Research International
Volume 2017, Article ID 2148139, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2148139
Research Article

The Better You Feel the Better You Learn: Do Warm Colours and Rounded Shapes Enhance Learning Outcome in Multimedia Learning?

1Educational Psychology, University of Würzburg, Röntgenring 10, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
2Media Communication, University of Würzburg, Oswald-Külpe-Weg 82, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
3TUM School of Education, Technical University of Munich, Arcisstraße 21, 80335 München, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Hannes Münchow; ed.grubzreuw-inu@wohcneum.sennah

Received 8 May 2017; Accepted 2 July 2017; Published 6 August 2017

Academic Editor: Phillip J. Belfiore

Copyright © 2017 Hannes Münchow et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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