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Education Research International
Volume 2019, Article ID 3464163, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3464163
Research Article

Exploring EFL Teachers’ Socioaffective and Pedagogic Strategies and Students’ Willingness to Communicate with a Focus on Iranian Culture

Department of English, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran

Correspondence should be addressed to Mahnaz Saeidi; ri.ca.tuai@idieas_m

Received 29 August 2018; Revised 1 November 2018; Accepted 18 December 2018; Published 6 February 2019

Academic Editor: Connie M. Wiskin

Copyright © 2019 Nahid Zarei et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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