Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Emergency Medicine International
Volume 2010, Article ID 525979, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/525979
Research Article

Ambulance Crash Characteristics in the US Defined by the Popular Press: A Retrospective Analysis

1Critical Illness & Trauma Foundation, 2135 Charlotte Street, Suite 2, Bozeman, MT 59718, USA
2Western Transportation Institute, P.O. Box 174250, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA

Received 1 July 2010; Accepted 22 October 2010

Academic Editor: Rade B. Vukmir

Copyright © 2010 Teri L. Sanddal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. L. Zagaroli and A. Taylor, Ambulance Driver Fatigue a Danger: Distractions Pose Risks to Patients, EMTs, Traffic, Detroit News Washington Bureau, Washington, DC, USA, 2003.
  2. N. D. Sanddal, S. Albert, J. D. Hansen, and D. F. Kupas, “Contributing factors and issues associated with rural ambulance crashes: literature review and annotated bibliography,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 257–267, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. N. R. Levick and J. Swanson, “Managing risk and reducing crashes: implementing a driver performance-measuring device in ground ambulances,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 9, no. 1, p. 108, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  4. Institute of Medicine, Quality through Collaboration: The Future of Rural Health, National Academies Press, Washington, DC, USA, 2005.
  5. A. M. Thompson III, “Rural emergency medical volunteers and their communities: a demographic comparison,” Journal of Community Health, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 379–392, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. C. L. Cheng, J. Collins, and S. Eaddy, “A comparison of rural and urban emergency medical systems (EMS) personnel: a Texas study,” Prehospital & Disaster Medicine, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 117–123, 2001. View at Google Scholar
  7. C. B. Custalow and C. S. Gravitz, “Emergency medical vehicle collisions and potential for preventive intervention,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 175–184, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. C. A. Kahn, R. G. Pirrallo, and E. M. Kuhn, “Characteristics of fatal ambulance crashes in the United States: an 11-year retrospective analysis,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 261–269, 2001. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. B. J. Maguire, K. L. Hunting, G. S. Smith, and N. R. Levick, “Occupational fatalities in emergency medical services: a hidden crisis,” Annals of Emergency Medicine, vol. 40, no. 6, pp. 625–632, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. “Use of warning lights and siren in emergency medical vehicle response and patient transport. National Association of Emergency Medical Services Physicians (NAEMSP) and the National Association of State EMS Directors (NASEMSD),” Prehospital & Disaster Medicine, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 133–136, 1994. View at Scopus
  11. S. G. Pratt, NIOSH Hazard Review. Work-Related Roadway Crashes: Challenges and Opportunities for Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC, USA, 2003.
  12. A. M. Ray and D. F. Kupas, “Comparison of crashes involving ambulances with those of similar-sized vehicles,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 412–415, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. B. Larmon, T. F. LeGassick, and D. L. Schriger, “Differential front and back seat safety belt use by prehospital care providers,” American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 595–599, 1993. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. T. Lindsey, The effects of computer simulation and learning styles on emergency vehicle drivers' competency in training course, Doctoral dissertation, University of South Florida, 2004.
  15. J. Erich, “Wheels of fortune. Every time you hit the streets, you take your life in your hands–how can you improve your chances?” Emergency Medical Services, vol. 29, no. 11, pp. 43–49, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. J. D. Whiting, K. Dunn, J. A. March, and L. H. Brown, “EMT knowledge of ambulance traffic laws,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 136–140, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. R. M. Barishansky, “Next generation ambulance puts safety first,” Emergency Medical Services, vol. 30, p. 34, 2005. View at Google Scholar
  18. K. De Graeve, K. F. Deroo, P. A. Calle, O. A. Vanhaute, and W. A. Buylaert, “How to modify the risk-taking behaviour of emergency medical services drivers?” European Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 111–116, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Ambulance crash-related injuries among emergency medical services workers-United States, 1991–2002,” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Review, vol. 52, no. 8, pp. 154–156, 2003. View at Google Scholar
  20. P. S. Auerback, J. A. Morris, J. B. Phillips, S. R. Redlinger, and W. K. Vaughn, “An analysis of ambulance accidents in Tennessee,” The Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 258, no. 11, pp. 1487–1490, 1987. View at Google Scholar
  21. Email, Valerie Defrance, Editor in Chief, EMSNetwork, email message to Nels D. Sanddal, July 2009.
  22. N. C. Mann, “Ambulance calls by quarter of the day: special data analysis request,” National EMS Information System—Technical Assistance Center. Salt Lake City Utah, USA, July 2009.
  23. S. J. Weiss, R. Ellis, A. A. Ernst, R. F. Land, and A. Garza, “A comparison of rural and urban ambulance crashes,” American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 52–56, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. S. P. Baker, R. A. Whitfield, and B. O'Neill, “Geographic variations in mortality from motor vehicle crashes,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 316, no. 22, pp. 1384–1387, 1987. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. D. Hunjadi, “From provider to patient,” Emergency Medical Services, vol. 34, no. 8, pp. 157–160, 2005. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. N. R. Levick and J. Swanson, “An optimal solution for enhancing ambulance safety: implementing a driver performance feedback and monitoring device in ground emergency medical service vehicles,” in Proceedings of the 49th Annual of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, pp. 35–50, Boston, Mass, USA, September 2005. View at Scopus
  27. R. F. Maio, P. E. Green, M. P. Becker, R. E. Burney, and C. Compton, “Rural motor vehicle crash mortality: the role of crash severity and medical resources,” Accident Analysis and Prevention, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 631–642, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. T. Cook, S. A. Meador, B. D. Buckingham, and L. V. Groff, “Opportunity for seatbelt usage by ALS providers,” Prehospital & Disaster Medicine, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 469–471, 1991. View at Google Scholar
  29. A. M. Ray and D. F. Kupas, “Comparison of rural and urban ambulance crashes in Pennsylvania,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 416–420, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus