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Emergency Medicine International
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1781684, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1781684
Review Article

Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants: Practical Considerations for Emergency Medicine Physicians

1Section of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Ben Taub General Hospital, 1504 Taub Loop, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Department of Emergency Medicine, Stony Brook School of Medicine, University Medical Center L4, 100 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8350, USA

Received 8 January 2016; Revised 11 March 2016; Accepted 29 March 2016

Academic Editor: Chak W. Kam

Copyright © 2016 W. Frank Peacock et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Supplementary Material

The primary efficacy and safety endpoints of the pivotal phase 3 clinical trials in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) demonstrated that direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) were at least as effective as warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke or systemic embolic events and were associated with similar or significantly decreased rates of bleeding (Supplementary Table 1). The primary efficacy and safety endpoints of the pivotal phase 3 clinical trials in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) demonstrated that DOACs were noninferior for the treatment of acute symptomatic VTE and were associated with similar or significantly decreased bleeding risks compared with standard therapy (low molecular weight heparin or unfractionated heparin followed by treatment with an overlapping VKA (vitamin K antagonist: warfarin or acenocoumarol)). In addition, VTE patients treated with DOACs and with standard therapy (heparin/VKA) experienced similar recurrence risks (Supplementary Table 2).

  1. Supplementary Material