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Enzyme Research
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 174354, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/174354
Review Article

Enzymatic Strategies to Detoxify Gluten: Implications for Celiac Disease

1Department of Chemistry, University of Salerno, 84084 Salerno, Italy
2European Laboratory for the Investigation of Food-Induced Diseases, University Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy

Received 4 July 2010; Accepted 14 September 2010

Academic Editor: Raffaele Porta

Copyright © 2010 Ivana Caputo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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