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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 523420, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/523420
Review Article

Canonical and Alternative Pathways in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1/Cyclin B Inactivation upon M-Phase Exit in Xenopus laevis Cell-Free Extracts

Cell Cycle Group, Institute of Genetics & Development, University of Rennes 1, CNRS-UMR 6061, Faculty of Medicine, 2 Avenue Prof. Léon Bernard, CS 34317, 35043 Rennes Cedex, France

Received 25 February 2011; Revised 1 April 2011; Accepted 18 April 2011

Academic Editor: Heung Chin Cheng

Copyright © 2011 Jacek Z. Kubiak and Mohammed El Dika. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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