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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 642758, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/642758
Research Article

Enzyme Mechanism and Slow-Onset Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase by an Inorganic Complex

1Instituto de Pesquisas em Patologias Tropicais (IPEPATRO), Rua da Beira 7671, Rodovia BR364 km 3.5, 76812-245 Porto Velho, RO, Brazil
2Centro de Pesquisas em Biologia Molecular e Funcional (CPBMF), Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Avenida Ipiranga 6681/92-A, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 22 December 2010; Accepted 25 January 2011

Academic Editor: Qi-Zhuang Ye

Copyright © 2011 Patrícia Soares de Maria de Medeiros et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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