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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 648159, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/648159
Review Article

The Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Is a Potential Target for Chemotherapy against Chagas Disease

Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bloco G-019, Cidade Universitária—Ilha do Fundão, 21941-902 Rio de Janeiro RJ, Brazil

Received 20 December 2010; Revised 17 February 2011; Accepted 25 February 2011

Academic Editor: Elena Gonzalez-Rey

Copyright © 2011 Carolina Macedo Koeller and Norton Heise. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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