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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 696942, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/696942
Research Article

Production of Xylanase from Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 6915 Using Saw Dust As Substrate under Solid State Fermentation

Microbiology Laboratory, School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Karunya University, Karunya Nagar, 641114, Coimbatore, India

Received 17 May 2011; Revised 1 July 2011; Accepted 8 August 2011

Academic Editor: Roberto Fernandez Lafuente

Copyright © 2011 Sevanan Murugan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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