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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 720194, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/720194
Research Article

Lipase Activity among Bacteria Isolated from Amazonian Soils

1Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Coordination, Amazon Biotechnology Center (CBA), Avnue Gov. Danilo Areosa, 690 Distrito Industrial, 69075351 Manaus, AM, Brazil
2Soil Microbiology Laboratory, National Research Institute of Amazonia (INPA), Caixa Postal 478, 69011-970 Manaus, AM, Brazil
3Soils and Plant Tissue Laboratory, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA-SOY), Rod. Carlos João Strass, Distrito de Warta, 86001-970 Londrina, PR, Brazil
4Department of Agronomy, Federal University of Tocantins (UFTO), Rua Badeijós, Lote 07, Chácara 69/72, Zona Rural, 77402-970 Gurupi, TO, Brazil

Received 14 April 2011; Revised 27 July 2011; Accepted 27 July 2011

Academic Editor: Alane Beatriz Vermelho

Copyright © 2011 André Luis Willerding et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to select lipase-producing bacteria collected from different counties of the Amazon region. Of the 440 bacteria strains, 181 were selected for the lipase assay in qualitative tests at Petri dishes, being 75 (41%) lipase positive. The enzymatic index was determined during fifteen days at different temperatures (30°, 35°, 40°, and 45°C). The highest lipase activity was observed within 72 hours at 30°C. Twelve bacteria strains presented an index equal to or greater than the standard used like reference, demonstrating the potential of microbial resource. After the bioassay in Petri dishes, the selected bacteria strains were analyzed in quantitative tests on p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP). A group of the strains was selected for other phases of study with the use in oleaginous substrates of the Amazonian flora, aiming for the application in processes like oil biotransformation.