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Enzyme Research
Volume 2011, Article ID 932549, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/932549
Review Article

Enolase: A Key Player in the Metabolism and a Probable Virulence Factor of Trypanosomatid Parasites—Perspectives for Its Use as a Therapeutic Target

1Laboratorio de Fisiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, 5101 Mérida, Venezuela
2Research Unit for Tropical Diseases, de Duve Institute, TROP 74.39, Université catholique de Louvain, Avenue Hippocrate 74, 1200 Brussels, Belgium
3Laboratorio de Enzimología de Parásitos, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, 5101 Mérida, Venezuela

Received 14 January 2011; Accepted 15 February 2011

Academic Editor: Claudio Alejandro Pereira

Copyright © 2011 Luisana Avilán et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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