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Enzyme Research
Volume 2016, Article ID 4379403, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4379403
Research Article

Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

1Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Chemo- and Biosensors, University of Regensburg, 93053 Regensburg, Germany
2Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, Assam 781039, India

Received 30 September 2015; Revised 11 December 2015; Accepted 20 December 2015

Academic Editor: John David Dignam

Copyright © 2016 Preety Vatsyayan and Pranab Goswami. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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