Table of Contents
Epidemiology Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 132392, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/132392
Research Article

Developing a Dynamic Microsimulation Model of the Australian Health System: A Means to Explore Impacts of Obesity over the Next 50 Years

National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Received 1 November 2011; Revised 12 February 2012; Accepted 19 March 2012

Academic Editor: Douglas G. Manuel

Copyright © 2012 Sharyn Lymer and Laurie Brown. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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