Table of Contents
Epidemiology Research International
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 520894, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/520894
Research Article

An Epidemiological Model for Examining Marijuana Use over the Life Course

1RAND Drug Policy Research Center, RAND Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA, 90401, USA
2Carnegie Mellon University, Heinz School, 1652 King James Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890, USA

Received 29 February 2012; Accepted 13 May 2012

Academic Editor: Jacek A. Kopec

Copyright © 2012 Susan M. Paddock et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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