Epidemiology Research International

Advances in Micro-simulation Modeling of Population Health Determinants, Diseases, and Outcomes


Publishing date
22 Jun 2012
Status
Published
Submission deadline
03 Feb 2012

Lead Editor

1School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3

2School of Clinical Sciences, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK

3Departments of Family Medicine and Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Y 4E9

4Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98101-1448, USA


Advances in Micro-simulation Modeling of Population Health Determinants, Diseases, and Outcomes

Description

Computer simulation models have been used in health research since the 1960s. Typical applications include hospital scheduling, spread of communicable diseases, effectiveness of screening programs, and economic evaluation. Most of the models have been macrosimulation models, which operate at the level of groups or systems. In contrast, microsimulation models simulate the behavior and generate the life histories of individual units, such as persons or household. Microsimulation models have been built primarily to evaluate the implications of social and economic policies, for example, income tax, social security, health benefits, and pension policies.

Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest in the development of population-based microsimulation models to project future distributions of health determinants and diseases in the population, estimate the contribution of different factors to changes in disease incidence, prevalence, and mortality, and predict the effects of disease prevention and treatment strategies on health outcomes. Development of such models has been facilitated by the increasing power and decreasing cost of computing infrastructure, combined with the growing availability of population health data. Examples include several cancer models developed by the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) in the USA, the multidisease Population Health Model (POHEM) in Canada, or SimObesity, a spatial microsimulation model of obesogenic environments in the UK.

We invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts to develop and validate health-related microsimulation models and use such models to address current health research and policy issues. We are interested in all applications of microsimulation models in the context of population health, including both communicable and noncommunicable diseases as well as model development and methodological research. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Population-health applications of microsimulation models
    • Projections of risk factor distribution in the population
    • Burden of disease and attributable burden studies
    • Assessment of disease prevention strategies
    • Evaluation of population health policies
    • Modeling and control of epidemics
    • Other applications of microsimulation models
  • Development of new health-related microsimulation models
  • Validation and calibration of microsimulation models
  • Methodological advances in microsimulation

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/eri/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 584739
  • - Editorial

Advances in Microsimulation Modeling of Population Health Determinants, Diseases, and Outcomes

Jacek A. Kopec | Kimberley Edwards | ... | Carolyn M. Rutter
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 832325
  • - Research Article

Projection of Social Burden of the Elderly in Japan Using INAHSIM-II

Tetsuo Fukawa
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 520894
  • - Research Article

An Epidemiological Model for Examining Marijuana Use over the Life Course

Susan M. Paddock | Beau Kilmer | ... | Rosalie L. Pacula
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 610405
  • - Research Article

Uncertainty Analysis in Population-Based Disease Microsimulation Models

Behnam Sharif | Jacek A. Kopec | ... | Michael C. Wolfson
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 241340
  • - Research Article

Using Simulation Modeling to Inform Strategies to Reduce Breast Cancer Mortality in Black Women in the District of Columbia

Aimee M. Near | Jeanne S. Mandelblatt | ... | Michael A. Stoto
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 304937
  • - Research Article

Can We Make Time for Physical Activity? Simulating Effects of Daily Physical Activity on Mortality

Geoff Rowe | Mark S. Tremblay | Douglas G. Manuel
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 132392
  • - Research Article

Developing a Dynamic Microsimulation Model of the Australian Health System: A Means to Explore Impacts of Obesity over the Next 50 Years

Sharyn Lymer | Laurie Brown
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2012
  • - Article ID 716072
  • - Research Article

Extracting Data from Disparate Sources for Agent-Based Disease Spread Models

M. Laskowski | B. C. P. Demianyk | ... | M. Crowley

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