Table of Contents
Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 385626, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/385626
Review Article

Spontaneous EEG-Functional MRI in Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Implications for the Neural Correlates of Consciousness

1Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 37211 TN, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
4Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
5Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5

Received 20 September 2011; Revised 21 November 2011; Accepted 19 December 2011

Academic Editor: Warren T. Blume

Copyright © 2012 Zheng Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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