Table of Contents
Epilepsy Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 736784, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/736784
Clinical Study

Noninvasive Approach to Focal Cortical Dysplasias: Clinical, EEG, and Neuroimaging Features

1Epilepsy Laboratory, IBCN, “Prof. E. De Robertis”, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Paraguay 2155, 1121 Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Epilepsy Section, Division of Neurology, Ramos Mejía Hospital, Urquiza 609, 1221 Buenos Aires, Argentina
3LEICI, School of Engineering, National University of La Plata, 48 y 116, 1900 La Plata, Argentina
4National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires, Argentina
5Scientific and Technical Research Commission, 526 e/ 10 y 11, Buenos Aires, 1900 La Plata, Argentina

Received 17 August 2011; Revised 10 November 2011; Accepted 21 November 2011

Academic Editor: Louis Lemieux

Copyright © 2012 Gustavo Seifer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Purpose. The main purpose is to define more accurately the epileptogenic zone (EZ) with noninvasive methods in those patients with MRI diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and epilepsy who are candidates of epilepsy surgery. Methods. Twenty patients were evaluated prospectively between 2007 and 2010 with comprehensive clinical evaluation, video-electroencephalography, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and high-resolution EEG to localize the equivalent current dipole (ECD). Key Findings. In 11 cases with white matter asymmetries in DTI the ECDs were located next to lesion on MRI with mean distance of 14.63 millimeters with topographical correlation with the EZ. Significance. We could establish a hypothesis of EZ based on Video-EEG, high-resolution EEG, ECD method, MRI, and DTI. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the EZ in the FCD is complex and is often larger than visible lesion in MRI.