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Geofluids
Volume 2017, Article ID 3942826, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3942826
Research Article

An Experimental Study of the Formation of Talc through CaMg(CO3)2–SiO2–H2O Interaction at 100–200°C and Vapor-Saturation Pressures

1State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research, School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023, China
2Institute of Energy Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023, China
3Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Depositional Mineralization and Sedimentary Minerals, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, Shandong 266510, China
4Laboratory of Experimental Study under Deep-Sea Extreme Conditions, Institute of Deep-Sea Science and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Sanya, Hainan 572000, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Xiaolin Wang; nc.ude.ujn@gnawnilx and Wenxuan Hu; nc.ude.ujn@xwuh

Received 14 February 2017; Accepted 31 May 2017; Published 4 July 2017

Academic Editor: Daniel E. Harlov

Copyright © 2017 Ye Wan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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