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Geofluids
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 5195469, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/5195469
Research Article

Lateral Percolation and Its Effect on Shale Gas Accumulation on the Basis of Complex Tectonic Background

1State Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources and Prospecting, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
2Unconventional Natural Gas Research Institute, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
3Unconventional Petroleum Collaborative Innovation Center, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249, China
4Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Beijing 100083, China
5School of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Xi’an Shiyou University, Xi’an 710065, China
6School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China
7Geoscience Documentation Center (CGS), Beijing 100083, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Zhenxue Jiang; moc.361@puceuxzj and Zhiye Gao; moc.361@eyihzoag

Received 18 September 2017; Accepted 13 November 2017; Published 11 January 2018

Academic Editor: Zhongwei Chen

Copyright © 2018 Kun Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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