Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics
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Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision140 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor1.9

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Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics publishes original research articles as well as review articles that increase our understanding of human health and disease worldwide.

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Research Article

Baseline Characteristics of Fabry Disease “Amenable” Migalastat Patients in Argentinian Cohort

Fabry disease (FD) is a multisystem lysosomal storage disorder induced by genetic variants in the alpha-galactosidase A (αGalA) gene. Some FD patients have GLA variants with a reduction in overall αGalA enzymatic activity due to mutated proteins with reduced stability, caused by protein misfolding and premature degradation, but the αGalA catalytic activity remains conserved (“amenable” genetic variants). To correct this misfolding and to prevent premature degradation, migalastat, a small iminosugar molecule was developed. We report the clinical characteristics of FD “amenable” cohort patients from Argentina, prior to starting treatment with migalastat. Seventeen Fabry adult patients were recruited from 13 Argentinian Centers; 8 males (47.1%) and 9 females (52.9%) were included. All genotypes included were missense-type “amenables” mutations. Some classic FD typical early manifestations were more frequent in patients with “classic” versus “late-onset” FD phenotype (pain, ; cornea verticillata, ). There was a statistically significant difference in estimated glomerular filtration rate in the “classic” versus “late-onset” phenotype () but no difference between genders (). Left ventricular mass was similar between genders () and phenotypes (). Cardiovascular risk factors were present among “late-onset” females (obesity 50% and smoke 25%). In patients who started “de novo” migalastat, the main indications were (i) heart disease, (ii) kidney damage, and (iii) pain, while in “switched from prior enzyme replacement therapy” patients, the most frequent indication was “patient decision;” this coincides with publications by other authors.

Research Article

Dietary Knowledge and Eating Habits among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Lebanon

Little is known about the dietary knowledge (DK) and eating habits (EHs) of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Lebanon. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the DK and EH of the population with T2D and determine their associated factors. A cross-sectional survey enrolling 351 patients with T2D was carried out, using the snowball sampling technique. The survey used the UK Diabetes and Diet Questionnaire and the Dietary Knowledge questionnaire to assess participants’ EH including the frequency of consumption of certain foods and their knowledge of food groups and food choices. While a higher DK index indicated better knowledge, a higher EH index indicated less healthy EH. Independent sample T-test and Mann–Whitney test were used for dichotomous variables, and ANOVA and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used for polytomous variables. Correlation analysis tested the association between two continuous variables. Two multiple linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with DK and EH. Overall, 67% of participants had good or adequate DK, and around 25% and 75% of them had healthy and less healthy EH, respectively. Better knowledge was significantly related to occupation, BMI, presence of comorbidities, and HbA1c testing during the last 3 months. Higher family income, physical activity, family history of diabetes, receiving help in medication administration from family or friends, and higher DK level were factors associated with healthier EH. Nutrition education and awareness campaigns aimed at patients and their families are needed to empower patients with adequate DK and skills to facilitate the adoption of healthy EH.

Research Article

Prevalence and Associated Factors of Adolescent Obesity among Rural School Adolescents in Nepal: A Cross-Sectional Study

Background. Overweight and obesity are major risk factors for chronic diseases and are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Obesity during adolescence is strongly associated with adulthood obesity leading to increased morbidities and mortality. As a developing country undergoing rapid urbanization, Nepal is in a transitional phase where undernutrition coexists with obesity; however, there is a dearth of literature on the status of adolescent obesity in the rural section of Nepal. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of adolescent obesity in a rural district of Nepal and find out its associated factors. Methods. An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted among the adolescent students studying in classes 8, 9, and 10 in four secondary schools of Gosaikunda rural municipality of Rasuwa district, Nepal. Total enumerative sampling was used, and Global School-based Health Survey (GSHS) standard questionnaires were used in collecting the information. Height and weight measurements were taken, and the body mass index was classified according to Asia-Pacific criteria. The collected data were analyzed using “SPSS” version 22. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the associated factors, and a value of ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. Out of 267 adolescents, 14.6% were obese and 14.6% were overweight. Of the female participants, 39.6% were either obese or overweight, while 12.6% of the male adolescents were overweight/obese. Among the total participants, 16.5% were underweight, including 14.0% females and 20.4% males. Female adolescents were about five times (AOR: 5.2, 95% CI (2.5–10.9),  < 0.01) more likely of being overweight/obese than male adolescents. Conclusions. More than one-quarter of the adolescents were found to be obese/overweight, and the prevalence was significantly more among female adolescents. It emphasizes the necessity of school-based programs promoting a healthy lifestyle among students to maintain healthy weight status.

Research Article

Developing Clinical Phenotype Data Collection Standards for Research in Africa

Modern biomedical research is characterised by its high-throughput and interdisciplinary nature. Multiproject and consortium-based collaborations requiring meaningful analysis of multiple heterogeneous phenotypic datasets have become the norm; however, such analysis remains a challenge in many regions across the world. An increasing number of data harmonisation efforts are being undertaken by multistudy collaborations through either prospective standardised phenotype data collection or retrospective phenotype harmonisation. In this regard, the Phenotype Harmonisation Working Group (PHWG) of the Human Heredity and Health in Africa (H3Africa) consortium aimed to facilitate phenotype standardisation by both promoting the use of existing data collection standards (hosted by PhenX), adapting existing data collection standards for appropriate use in low- and middle-income regions such as Africa, and developing novel data collection standards where relevant gaps were identified. Ultimately, the PHWG produced 11 data collection kits, consisting of 82 protocols, 38 of which were existing protocols, 17 were adapted, and 27 were novel protocols. The data collection kits will facilitate phenotype standardisation and harmonisation not only in Africa but also across the larger research community. In addition, the PHWG aims to feed back adapted and novel protocols to existing reference platforms such as PhenX.

Review Article

Pain Management in Pediatric Burns: A Review of the Science behind It

Pediatric burns are a significant medical issue that can have long-term effects on various aspects of a child’s health and well-being. Pain management in pediatric burns is a crucial aspect of treatment to ensure the comfort and well-being of young patients. The causes and risk factors for pediatric burns vary depending on various factors, such as geographical location, socioeconomic status, and cultural practices. Assessing pain in pediatric patients, especially during burn injury treatment, poses several challenges. These challenges stem from various factors, including the age and developmental stage of the child, the nature of burn injuries, and the limitations of pain assessment tools. In pediatric pain management, various pain assessment tools and scales are used to evaluate and measure pain in children. These tools are designed to account for the unique challenges of assessing pain in pediatric patients, including their age, developmental stage, and ability to communicate effectively. Pain can have significant physical, emotional, and psychological consequences for pediatric patients. It can interfere with their ability to engage in daily activities, disrupt sleep patterns, and negatively affect their mood and behavior. Untreated pain can also lead to increased stress, anxiety, and fear, which can further exacerbate the pain experience. Acute pain, which is short-term and typically associated with injury or illness, can disrupt a child’s ability to engage in physical activities and impede their overall recovery process. On the other hand, chronic pain, which persists for an extended period, can have long-lasting effects on physical functioning and quality of life in children. The psychological consequences of burns can persist long after the physical wounds have healed, leading to ongoing emotional distress and impaired functioning. Multimodal pain management, which involves the use of multiple interventions or medications targeting different aspects of the pain pathway, has gained recognition as an effective approach for managing pain in both children and adults. However, it is important to consider the specific needs and considerations of pediatric patients when developing evidence-based guidelines for multimodal pain management in this population. Over the years, there have been significant advances in pediatric pain research and technology, leading to a better understanding of pain mechanisms and the development of innovative approaches to assess and treat pain in children. Overall, pain management in pediatric burns requires a multidisciplinary approach that combines pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions.

Research Article

Time to Recovery from COVID-19 and Its Predictors in Patients Hospitalized at Tibebe Ghion Specialized Hospital Care and Treatment Center, A Retrospective Follow-Up Study, North West Ethiopia

Background. Since the end of 2019, the world has been facing a new coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), which is considered a global pandemic. COVID-19 is considered a major public health burden due to the uncontrolled morbidity and mortality of the global community. The World Health Organization estimates the recovery time as 2 weeks for patients with mild infection and 3 to 6 weeks for those with serious illnesses. The recovery time and its predictors are not well studied in Ethiopia yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate time to recovery from COVID-19 and its predictors among COVID-19 patients admitted to Tibebe Ghion Specialized Hospital care and treatment center, North West Ethiopia. Methods. An institution-based retrospective follow-up study was conducted among 452 COVID-19 patients admitted to Tibebe Ghion Specialized Hospital from March 2020 to September 2021. Simple random sampling using a table of random number generators was used to select study units. Data entry and analysis were performed using EpiData 3.1 and Stata version 14, respectively. Bivariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to identify predictors of recovery time. An AHR at a 5% level of significance was used to identify significant predictors. Results: Among 452 COVID-19 patients, 437 (88%) were recovered, with a median recovery time of 9 days. Recovery time was significantly related to age (AHR = 0.98; 95% CI = 0.97, 0.99), oxygen saturation (AHR = 0.42; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.56), shortness of breath (AHR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.85), disease severity (moderate (AHR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.85) and severe (AHR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.22, 0.47)), and comorbidities (AHR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.53, 0.84). Conclusions and recommendations: The overall median recovery time was 9 days. Older age, low oxygen saturation, shortness of breath, disease severity (moderate and severe), history of comorbidities, and high-level of WBC were predictors of delayed recovery time. On the other hand, corticosteroid use significantly shortens the median recovery time of COVID-19 patients. Thus, patients presented with older age, low oxygen saturation, shortness of breath, moderate and severe COVID-19 disease, comorbidities, and increased WBC need to be closely monitoring and followed up by healthcare providers. In addition, there should be special attention during the administration of corticosteroid.

Global Health, Epidemiology and Genomics
Publishing Collaboration
More info
CUP logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate15%
Submission to final decision140 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore2.200
Journal Citation Indicator0.360
Impact Factor1.9
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