GastroHep
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 Journal profile

GastroHep is an international, peer reviewed, high quality publication focussing on current and cutting edge research in academic and clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. 

 Editor spotlight

Her Hsin Tsai, the Chief Editor, is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Fellow of the European Board of Gastroenterology, has been a consultant gastroenterologist in Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals for over 23 years, is a fully practicing clinician and has over 40 publications.

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John Wiley and Sons, Inc. and Hindawi collaborate on an Open Access publishing partnership. 

Latest Articles

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Review Article

Improving the Treatment Response of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Implementing a Second-Generation Artificial Intelligence System for Overcoming Resistance

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional disorder. The syndrome’s multifactorial pathophysiology makes it challenging to design effective therapies. The present paper reviews several therapeutic approaches to treating IBS, highlighting the challenges of losing response over time to therapies. Here, we present the relevance of chronobiology in biological systems focusing on the potential of chronotherapy for IBS. Artificial intelligence- (AI-) based approaches have been developed over the last few years to improve the diagnosis, therapeutic approaches, and monitoring of patients with various diseases. We discuss the use of first-generation AI platforms and their limitations in clinical practice and present the establishment of a second-generation system designed to overcome obstacles in managing these patients. The system identifies costly patients and those who do not respond to therapies and may benefit from algorithm-based therapies. We present a patient-tailored approach for improving the response to therapy in IBS using an AI-based algorithm. This system provides a tool for a patient-tailored monitoring system. The second-generation AI system can provide a comprehensive tool for improving the diagnosis and therapy and monitoring of patients with IBS.

Research Article

Cost-Effectiveness of Intravenous Iron Formulations in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anaemia and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, in a Swedish Regional Setting Using Real-World Tender Prices

Aims. A widespread complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), which affects quality of life (QoL) and is associated with frequent hospitalizations. The intravenous iron therapies, ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), ferric derisomaltose (FD), and iron sucrose (IS), have previously been shown to replenish haemoglobin (Hb) levels more effectively than oral iron. However, they differ in both costs and efficacy (response to treatment), leading to differences in acquisition by health-care payers. We investigated the cost-effectiveness of FCM versus FD and IS, in terms of additional cost per additional responder, for the treatment of IBD-associated IDA in multiple Swedish regional settings, using current tender prices. Methods and Materials. A microsimulation model estimated the additional cost per patient achieving a response, based on Hb normalization or an increase of ≥2 g/dL in Hb levels. Efficacy estimates were taken from a previously published network meta-analysis. Treatment costs (2021 SEK) included current tender prices in Swedish health-care regions. Resource use depended partly on dosing, which was based on patient characteristics simulated in the model. Results. The analysis showed that FCM was associated with the highest number of responders (81%) compared to FD (74%) and IS (75%), while costing less per responder than its comparators, in included regions. Conclusions. These results suggest that regional health-care budget holders should consider more than drug prices when choosing which IV formulations to acquire and that they should use all available tools when deciding how to fulfil the needs of their patients.

Research Article

Profiling the Use of Complementary Alternative Medicines among Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients: Results from a Single Center Survey

Background. Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) are used by patients with chronic disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with a desire to manage their disease. Methods. Patients visiting an IBD outpatient clinic and infusion unit in a tertiary referral center were surveyed through an anonymized Dutch version of the international questionnaire to measure the use of CAMs. Results. Of the 467 IBD patients who responded to the survey, 41.8% () reported the use of CAMs. Gender (, higher in females), educational qualification (, higher in more educated patients), and number of prior IBD medical treatments (, higher in patients having received more than one therapy) were significantly associated with CAM usage. Overall, there was no significant difference in CAM-usage between UC (45.3%) and CD (38.2%) patients. Over two-thirds of patients reported using CAMs to alleviate IBD-related symptoms. The most prevalent reason for CAM-usage was to minimize stress and symptoms. The top five nonsupplemental CAMs used by IBD patients included probiotics, curcumin, yoghurt, homeopathy, and yoga. Among CAMs with a minimum of 25 users, yoga (93.5%), cannabis (87.5%), and mindfulness (84.6%) had high self-reported efficacy indices. Fifty-six percent of the patients who affirmed the economic worthiness of CAMs expressed their interest to consult with their gastroenterologist about CAM-conventional therapy interactions. Conclusion. CAM usage in IBD patients is highly prevalent, and consultation of the patients with the gastroenterologist about the use of CAMs is warranted. Since CAMs can interact with conventional therapies, a debate could help optimizing CAM use, eventually resulting in better disease management.

Review Article

Best Practices in Liver Biopsy Histologic Assessment for Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Trials: Expert Opinion

Background. In most clinical trials focusing on precirrhotic nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a liver biopsy is required for confirmation of diagnosis, staging fibrosis, and grading steatohepatitis activity. Reliance on the biopsy, both as a requisite for study entry, as well as for a primary endpoint in clinical trials, poses several challenges that need to be overcome: patient reluctance to undergo the procedure; potential sampling error; concern regarding the handling, processing and shipping of the biopsy of the biopsy material to the central reader(s); and the degree of pathologists’ intra- and interobserver variability in biopsy interpretation. Aims. To provide recommendations for improving the liver biopsy process in order to maximize the accuracy of its histological interpretation in NASH clinical trials. Methods and Results. These recommendations were created by an expert panel of participants from the United States and European Union who met multiple times and reached alignment through review of available data and their individual clinical experiences. The recommendations include the methodology for biopsy procedure, central lab and pathology processing of the specimen, and recommendations to minimize the intra- and intersubject variability. Finally, we are discussing digital pathology technology and machine learning applications as important additions to enhance liver biopsy interpretation.Conclusions. Liver biopsy poses multiple challenges in clinical trials in NASH, and there is a need to standardize the processes to maximize accuracy and minimize variability. Many questions remained unanswered due to limited available data. New evolving modalities may help in the future, but generation of robust data is warranted.

Research Article

Outcomes of COVID-19 among Patients with Chronic Liver Disease: A Danish Prospective, Population-Based Cohort Study

Aims. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis are associated with immune dysregulation and might increase the risk of acquiring COVID-19 and developing more severe outcomes of it. In a population-based cohort study of patients with chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, we investigated the association between liver disease and COVID-19. We assessed the impact of COVID-19 infection on disease severity and the course of liver disease. Methods. We included all patients living in the Capital Region of Denmark and Region Zealand with chronic liver disease and a positive RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2. The background population was 2.7 million people; of these, 19,743 people had a diagnosis of liver disease. Between Feb 1, 2020, and Feb 27, 2021, 7,240 people with chronic liver disease were tested for SARS-CoV-2. Results. There were 261 patients with chronic liver disease and COVID-19 in the study. Sixty-four (24.2%) patients had cirrhosis. People with cirrhosis were more likely to require hospitalization than patients with chronic liver disease (71.8% versus 16.2%, ) and more likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit (7.8% versus 3.6%, ) and had higher rates of mortality (18.7% versus 1.5%, ). In univariate analyses controlled for age, gender, and comorbidities, cirrhosis remained an independent predictor of severe COVID-19. Of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis, 41% experienced a worsening of their liver disease during their COVID-19 infection. Conclusion. Patients with chronic liver disease, especially those with cirrhosis, are at major risk of a severe COVID-19 disease course and higher mortality.

Research Article

Concordance between Patients and Clinicians for Reporting Symptoms Associated with Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C during a Pragmatic Clinical Trial

Background. Despite high efficacy rates for direct acting antiviral regimens to cure hepatitis C virus infection, many patients experience treatment-related symptoms. Accurate reporting of adverse events is mandatory to determine drug safety. Previous research in other medical conditions has documented discordance between clinician-reported and patient-reported symptomatic adverse events. Aims. To explore concordance and associated factors, between clinician-recorded and patient-reported fatigue, headache, and nausea/vomiting during a clinical trial of three treatment regimens. Methods. Data were collected between treatment start and 31 days posttreatment. Patients completed Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System measures of fatigue and nausea/vomiting and the Headache Impact Test. Clinician-recorded data were abstracted from medical records. Concordance was evaluated by weighted kappa. Demographic and clinical factors associated with concordance were identified using logistic regression models. Results. Participants included 1,058 patients treated for chronic hepatitis C (average 54.9 years; 43% Black; 59% male). Weighted kappa estimates and 95% confidence intervals between patients (no/mild vs. moderate/severe symptoms) and clinicians (not present vs. present) were fatigue (, 0.02-0.16), headache (, 0.02-0.14), and nausea/vomiting (, 0.11-0.28). Older age and having private insurance (compared to Medicaid) were associated with better headache concordance. Older age, male, absence of psychiatric condition, and ≤2 comorbidities were associated with better nausea/vomiting concordance. Conclusions. Poor concordance was observed between patient-reported and clinician-recorded symptomatic adverse events. Despite study limitations, previous literature in other conditions support these findings. Integrating patient-reported data to inform adverse event reporting would improve evaluations of treatment safety (http://CT.gov/ Registration: NCT02786537).

GastroHep
Publishing Collaboration
More info
Wiley Hindawi logo
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate36%
Submission to final decision65 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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 Author guidelines Editorial board
 Author guidelines Editorial board

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.