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Genetics Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 309865, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/309865
Review Article

RNA Polymerase II Elongation at the Crossroads of Transcription and Alternative Splicing

1Laboratorio de Fisiología y Biología Molecular, Departamento de Fisiología, Biología Molecular, y Celular, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, C1428EHA Buenos Aires, Argentina
2Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
3Department of Biology, Institute of Biochemistry, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland

Received 15 June 2011; Accepted 23 June 2011

Academic Editor: Carles Sune

Copyright © 2011 Manuel de la Mata et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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