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Genetics Research International
Volume 2012, Article ID 129575, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/129575
Research Article

Community Genetic Services in Iran

1School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166615739, Iran
2Health System Research Committee, Tabriz Health Services Management Research Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166615739, Iran
3Pediatric Health Research Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166615739, Iran
4Tabriz Health Services Management Research Centre, School of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 5166615739, Iran

Received 27 July 2012; Revised 12 November 2012; Accepted 13 November 2012

Academic Editor: Maj Hulten

Copyright © 2012 Shirin Atri Barzanjeh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of the study was to report a description of the primary, secondary, and tertiary level services available for genetic disorders in Iran. For the purpose of this study, essential data were collected from every facility providing community genetic services in Tabriz city of Iran using a prestructured checklist. Technical information was filled in the predesigned forms using diagnostic records of each client/patient. Information was also gathered from community genetic services clients through a face-to-face interview at these facilities to assess the quality of services provided. Primary prevention measures were available in 80 percent of centres in the study population. Diagnostic techniques were fully available in the study area both in public and private sectors. Screening of congenital hypothyroidism and thalassemia has been successfully performed across the country by the Ministry of Health. Other screening programs have also been initiated by the country health authorities for neural tube defects, Down syndrome, and phenylketonuria. The high cost of genetic services at secondary and tertiary levels does not allow many people to get access to these services despite their needs. Governments will therefore need to allocate necessary resources to make the essential genetic services available for everyone needing these in the community.